CBD News

CBD Is Everywhere, Helping You Choose

January 23rd, 2019 by Cara Oorbeck

CBD Is Everywhere

By Brandy Palmer Founder and Owner of Green wellness Life

When I started working in the hemp industry 4 years ago, it was a whole new world for me.  I could name maybe 5 uses for hemp – and none of them had anything to do with balance in our bodies. The CBD industry at that time was still new. I definitely couldn’t spell cannabidiol and my family and friends hassled me with a lot of pot jokes!  Fast forward to 2019 and it seems that CBD is becoming a common household item. It’s everywhere – from your inbox (seriously – I have three emails TODAY inviting me to participate in CBD studies, from companies I can’t pronounce) and Facebook feed, to your local discount shoe store and hair salon. That is awesome and challenging all at the same time. This is a compound that we are putting in and on our bodies. Many of the people hawking CBD today don’t know a thing about it. This is bad for both the people that are buying and selling it. CBD can be confusing especially for someone trying to find the best choice for their unique system and circumstances. Here’s hoping that this article can help you to know what to look for when buying CBD.

Time in the Industry

New companies that manufacture CBD products are popping up daily. The 2014 Farm Bill made it legal to grow and produce a multitude of products with hemp in the United States. This bill also came with a number of restrictions. These restrictions created some barriers for manufacturers. Many of these restrictions were effectively wiped out with the 2018 Farm Bill update, and the floodgates are effectively opening. Some of these new companies offer great products; However we also know that in the US 1 in 3 businesses will fail in the first year. They may have an awesome product, but marketing and managing a team is an entirely different animal to tame. There’s nothing worse than coming to rely on a product for your family and then learning that it’s no longer an option for you! I’m still pretty angry at TGI Friday’s for getting rid of their grilled vegetable sandwich and there was significantly less at stake there, than on the CBD I take daily. So make sure that the company you’re buying from has been in business for a little while.

Product Knowledge

There are a lot of areas that I am not knowledgeable about. Ask me about computers or why your car engine is making a funny sound, and I’ll stare at you blankly. Ask me about CBD, though, and I know some things. You need that knowledge if you’re new to hemp and the compounds it’s made up of.  It’s great to start with a company that you heard about from friends or family, but your needs may be unique from theirs. It is key to call that company and ask them questions. You’ll know pretty quickly if they know what they are talking about or NOT! If it’s the latter, steer clear! You need an knowledgeable company to help you to be an educated consumer.

There’s a tanning salon in my town that’s selling CBD. They have big posters in their window and a cutesy display on their counter. I went in and asked some questions and knew in about 1 minute that the adorable girl working had NO CLUE what she was selling. That’s not only bad business, it’s likely a turn off to people who will try products. It is easy to take CBD but when you do not know which kind or how much you need to take and how to increase in order to see results you can easily get frustrated and deduce that you saw no results…“CBD doesn’t work!” Make sure that the company you’re working with knows the product.

Avoiding Medical Claims

I know I’m a broken record here, but there really is no “one size fits all” with CBD. Can I promise it will heal your <insert problem here>? No, I can’t. No one can. If they promise a specific medical result, that’s not only unethical – it’s potentially predatory. Many people see a real benefit from CBD, once they have determined the right product and serving size and are taking it consistently. “Many” doesn’t mean everyone. I’ve told people directly that I don’t think that they will see what they are looking for from CBD, which is not an easy thing to say. I’ve also told people that I thought they would see a real benefit and they didn’t. At the end of the day, every system is unique and each person will see varying results with CBD. If the company that you are working with tells you anything other than that, find a new company.

Customer Service

As the CBD market grows, it can be easy to find multiple companies selling the same products.  When that happens, the key difference will be the service. Look for customer reviews and check out their return policy. If your initial choice isn’t a great fit, make sure that the company you’re working with will, at a minimum, swap it out for another product. Be sure to ask if all sales are individual or if you’re signing up for a monthly subscription program? There’s certainly nothing wrong with subscriptions – I get my vitamins like clockwork and that’s pretty convenient; but they can get us into trouble sometimes. I like those meal subscription services. They do pile up quickly and I tend to forget to cancel a week. This results in lots and lots of cooking and freezing meals. Oops. Make sure that you have some flexibility and are fully aware of the cost if you do go the subscription route.

Product Options

I like to buy as many products as I can from one source. I blame Amazon for spoiling me, but it’s reality. If I can find one source I trust, I stick with them. The same should be true for CBD. I give cannabidiol to my dog and two cats, my son, and my husband. We use a variety of products from tincture to e-liquid and salves and there is a real value in being able to get them from one place. There is no “one size fits all” when it comes to CBD, so when a company has a variety of options, it means that I have a better chance of finding my best fit without having to look to another source.

Clear Labeling & Descriptions

CBD is one of the more than 80 different compounds in hemp and marijuana plants. Many CBD products that you buy contain all of those compounds, while others are strictly the isolated CBD. You should know that from a clear label and product description. We go into greater detail in another blog…see more. The amount of CBD in a product should not be a guessing game. While some manufacturers do call it different things (Hemp Extract, Phytocannabinoid Blend, Phytocannabinoid Rich Oil to name a few,) you should always see the total milligrams of that active CBD on the product label.  You should also know that test data is available and be able receive that detail when you ask for it. That test data will show you that what you want is in there, and what you want to avoid (think high THC, pesticides, heavy metals) is not present. If the label and description aren’t clear, and you can’t get the detail you need from Customer Service, take a pass.

Cost

The old adage “you get what you pay for” is true here to a point.  You want to be looking at the cost per milligram of CBD. That cost per milligram will be higher on things like gummies and chocolate because of the other ingredients. Some manufacturers have a perceived brand value and will charge more per milligram, but you should otherwise see fairly close pricing for the same type of CBD. It’s important to compare apples to apples – a CBD isolate product will not be the same cost as a full-spectrum, but if you’re looking at two 1000 mg bottles of full-spectrum tincture (even if those bottles are different sizes!), they should be fairly close in price.  If not, ask why and steer clear of both overpriced and under priced products.

These are exciting times, where we as consumers have more access to information than anyone who came before us.  We can take control of our own health and well-being and that of our families. Was it Spiderman that said “With great power comes great responsibility?” I may have my superheroes mixed up, but you get the point. Making smart choices about what we put in and on our bodies is definitely a great responsibility – here’s hoping that this article has helped lift that burden, if even a little bit.

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Part 2 – Body in Balance (The Best CBD for you)

January 17th, 2019 by Cara Oorbeck

best cbd

By Cara Oorbeck & Brandy Palmer – The Green Wellness Crew!

Isolate, Full Spectrum or Raw?

Finding the right CBD for your needs and body can be confusing. We answer customer questions all day long and we have found that there is no one size fits all. Each individual is different and finding the right fit for you can be confusing. So let’s take a look at the different forms of CBD: What is the difference between them? Who would use which version, and why?

What exactly is CBD, and where does it come from?

First of all, it’s important to understand that cannabidiol (CBD) is only one of the major compounds that are present in the cannabis plant – both hemp and marijuana. It happens to be one of the most studied compounds by scientists because of its powerful potential and the fact that it occurs in greater quantities in the plant than some of the other more than 80+ compounds. As evidence of its interest to scientists and researchers, CBD has been used in multiple pharmaceutical solutions. One of the most recent to be approved by the FDA is Epidiolex, a CBD-based drug used to treat childhood epilepsy.

Despite its fame, CBD is not the only major component in cannabis sativa. There are a range of other compounds that make up the plant, though CBD garners most mainstream attention these days.

Full Spectrum CBD Oil: A Rainbow of Compounds

This is a lot like it sounds: full spectrum CBD oil means that manufacturers use the whole plant and all the cannabinoids found therein instead of just the CBD.

Full-spectrum is unique in that it can introduce the user to the possible positive effects of the other components of cannabis working together, often referred to as the entourage effect. Though there are many different cannabinoids in the plant, here are a few of the better-known ones included in full spectrum products.

1. THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol)

Full-spectrum CBD from the hemp plant does include trace amounts of THC, which is well-known as the psychoactive element of cannabis – or the part that makes you high. It’s can’t be more a .3% concentration when coming from a hemp plant, so it has no psychoactive effect. There is technology that is isolating the THC out of some full spectrum products making it what is now being referred to as a “broad spectrum.” This means that it started as a full spectrum, but the THC was isolated and removed from the other cannabinoids. These products will usually specify 0 THC. Examples of this are KOI Tincture and Natural Leaf softgels

2. CBN (Cannabinol)
This component of cannabis does not occur in as great a quantity, so we don’t know quite enough about it yet. What science is finding is exciting, though. Some early studies are showing that there may be real benefits for people struggling with sleep issues.

3. CBG (Cannabigerol)
Interestingly, CBG has been shown to stimulate growth of new brain cells and stimulates bone growth. These unusual properties make it a fascinating compound for researchers to study.

4. THCV (Tetrahydrocannabivarin)
THCV has a similar molecular structure to THC and is also psychoactive. Research is finding that it’s very similar to CBD as well, in working to balance and neutralize cells.

All of these compounds—and far more—interact in a full-spectrum product. Who would this form of CBD work for? A full-spectrum CBD oil would work great for someone who wants to work with all the elements of the cannabis plant for a holistic approach. It would be very useful for those who are interested in other compounds, like CBG and THCV, and their effects. It’s important to keep in mind that unless clearly stated to be a 0% THC product (ie broad spectrum,) full spectrum products will likely contain a trace amount of THC. That legal limit, if coming from hemp, is 0.3%.

CBD Isolate: Pure CBD Oil

In a CBD Isolate, only one compound is present—CBD. It’s been individually extracted from the plant without any of the other cannabinoids, terpenes or plant matter. Some might say that the isolate is missing some of the other compounds that make full-spectrum oil special. While this is true to an extent, there are plenty of reasons why someone might want just pure CBD oil.

For one, maybe they’re only interested in specific CBD oil effects. If a user has discovered that CBD works best alone to treat their particular disorder or ease their symptoms, then they would definitely want to stick with what works. Other users might feel uncomfortable with even trace amounts of the psychoactive compound THC in full spectrum; in this case isolate CBD is a perfect solution.

Others may actually be allergic or have had bad reactions to other cannabinoids. In this case, a CBD isolate would be the best choice to make sure he or she only consumes a product that’s pure with no trace of other compounds.

Raw CBDA-CBD

“Cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) is a chemical compound found in the resin glands (trichomes) of raw cannabis plants.” In this case, raw means unheated and uncured. Many of the conditions that respond with CBD also respond well to CBDA but there is a growing body of information that is talking about the benefits of raw or CBDA having a greater affect on people living with chronic pain. There is also a patent pending by GW Parmaceuticals using CBDA in conjunction with CBD for anxiety and psychotic disorders.

Whatever your choice when it comes to CBD, it’s important to make sure you’re thinking with a comprehensive view of what you body needs at a given time. If you don’t have any allergies or issues with compounds in a full spectrum product, maybe compare its effects in your body to pure CBD isolate and see what makes you feel better. Every system is unique. We know it’s heard to hear, but there is no one size fits all. At the end of the day, the best CBD for you is the one that you will reap benefit from!


Endocannabinoid System

January 8th, 2019 by Cara Oorbeck

Endocannabinoid System

by Quinton Charles Op-Ed Blogger

Most people who have watched the news regarding recent legislation (especially in Michigan) know that hemp can be legally cultivated industrially nation-wide, and they will likely also understand that there are a myriad of health benefits associated with CBD oil. While this understanding is good, it often assumes that the benefits derived from CBD are a result of introducing some substance not found in the body to your bodily system. This couldn’t be farther from the truth.

What is the ECS…Endocannabinoid System?

The Endocannabinoid System, hereafter referred to as “ECS,” is a system that provides the body with many similar cannabinoids to those of hemp oil. Cannabinoids are complex chemical compounds that act on receptors in cells. The hemp plant produces over 100 different cannabinoids (or phytocannabinoids); the mammalian body also naturally produces cannabinoids (or endocannabinoids). This means that your body already uses cannabinoids for many of its functions, such as regulating mood, appetite, pain-sensation, and memory. It also plays a part in dealing with Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, cancer, atherosclerosis, stroke, hypertension, obesity, glaucoma, and osteoporosis.

What do Cannabinoids do?

The function of cannabinoids in your body (regardless of whether they are from the ECS or CBD oil) is to act as receptors for cells. What these receptors do is act as conduits for messages from the brain to the cells. They are the “bridge” that enables your body to operate as it should. Because of this, they are essential for a healthy body, which includes memory, appetite, and mood.

Interestingly, your body, while it uses the endocannabinoids produced internally, also reacts to phytocannabinoids from sources like cannabis and hemp. This is where CBD oils come in.

Endocannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2

The ECS is comprised to two primary endocannabinoid receptors: CB1 (found predominantly in the brain, nervous system, and outlying organs and tissues) and CB2 (found predominantly in white blood cells, tonsils and spleen). Although CBD has low affinity for either of these receptors, it does interact with other nominal receptors with remarkable effects. For example, CBD activates the receptor GPR55, which has been shown to assist in treating pain and inflammation. CBD has also been shown as a partial agonist (which is a term referring to something that attaches to a cell receptor and causes an action to occur in that cell) to the 5-HT1A receptor, which may lead to cannabidiol’s anti-depressant, anti-anxiety, and neuro-protective effects.

Why take daily CBD?

Because the ECS is involved in the body’s communication with its cells and their functions (including repairs), cannabinoids are crucial for the body’s constant repair of cells and their functions. When more cannabinoids are introduced to this delicate system, they can stimulate the cells into functioning as the brain directs them to, and can facilitate healing where the body’s own ECS has failed. In this, it is clear that when the ECS is failing to do its job, phytocannabinoids from CBD oils can “pick up the slack” and act as receptors for cells that were malfunctioning due to a lack of endocannabinoids. This makes CBD crucial for maintaining (or, in many cases, restoring) a healthy balance of receptors in the body.

While you’re healthy, CBD oil is not required to ensure that your cell receptors are functioning properly, as your ECS is most likely doing its job, and if you’re beset by chronic pain, problems with memory, appetite, or mood, there is the possibility that it is due to an imbalance in your ECS that is hindering your cells from properly receiving messages from your brain. In both cases, CBD oil is useful. If you’re already healthy, the extra CBD could either maintain that health, or boost your ECS’s efficacy in an area that maybe was not apparent to you. If you’re struggling with a particular health issue, first consult a physician, but consider CBD oil as a supplement that could boost your ECS and give your cells the boost that they may need.

If you visit the physician for any maladies that were mentioned in this article, bring up the idea of CBD oil as a possible treatment, and ask if it could be your ECS.


How is CBD Good For My Aging Body?

January 3rd, 2019 by Cara Oorbeck
Aging Body

By Quinton Charles OP-ED Blogger

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Our Aging Bodies

A healthy body and mind are assets that every individual possesses, yet also assets that, if not properly maintained, can become burdensome. This is especially true during the aging process.

As an individual’s body ages, their cognitive performance decreases, their limbs and joints begin to ache as they lose their suppleness, and the heart, from years of a not-so-forgiving western diet, becomes beset with a number of problems including (but not limited to) cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, ischemia, and dilated arteries. In addition to all of this, anxiety and diabetes increasingly affect larger numbers of Americans each year.

Medicines Are Not Wonder Drugs

While there are various types of medicines on the market that can accomodate these complications (with varying degrees of success), they often have side-effects that mitigate their salutary effects. This is where CBD oil comes in.

I have to clarify now that CBD oil is not a panacea. It will not cure all ailments, or even guarantee the alleviation of severe pain. There are studies that have confirmed the benefits of CBD oil to one’s health, with particular focus given to anxiety, chronic pain, mood stabilization and many more, but as it is with all clinically-tested medicines and supplements, these do not assure success. However, what sellers of CBD oil products can claim is that the supplements that they sell will not have a slew of negative side-effects (save for if you have a hemp allergy or something similar), unlike many drugs on the market.

CBD And Our Aging Body

Now that I hope it is clear that I am not speaking about CBD as some wonder-drug, lets discuss some of the benefits of CBD. As I already mentioned, one of the major draws of CBD products are their ability to lessen the severity of pain:

Much more research is needed, but “Several studies have shown CBD to not only alleviate onset pain caused by arthritis, but to physiologically reverse its underlying causes (at least in the case of rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease). For acute treatment, both internal(sublingual capsules or tinctures and topical CBD creams and ointments have shown to be the most effective method.

This may offer a drastic increase in the quality of life afforded seniors. The opportunity to live, perhaps not without pain, but with less severe pain and arthritis, is not to be understated.

CBD And Our Bones

Another area of the body where the positive effects of CBD oil are demonstrated is in the bones. Osteoporosis is caused by a buildup of fat in the marrow compartments of one’s bones.

CBD regulates this buildup. In fact, several studies have shown how the cannabinoid prevents age-related osteoporosis and promotes bone health by regulating CB receptors within the bone marrow. CB receptors regulate pain and immune system functions within the bone marrow, decreasing the sensations of pain and the swelling of cells that would lead to osteoporosis. And it isn’t just in the bones that CBD regulates the breakdown of cells and limits cell aging. CBD has been known to have the same “anti-aging” effects on other organs of the body, including the liver, kidney, eyes, stomach, and even the skin. Cells of all organ and tissue types are prone to normal breakdown and degeneration over time, and cannabinoids have been known to prohibit degeneration by stimulating CB receptors within the respective cell membranes. These CB receptors have been found in virtually every cell and tissue type in the human body.

Finally, CBD benefits the brain, the most vital organ that any individual can possess. CBD is patented by the US Government for its role as a “neuroprotectant”. This means that it physiologically acts to reverse the effects of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s. These diseases break down the myelin coating around nerve fibers in the brain, which decreases the speed at which the brain’s synapses can fire and connect, thus limiting the cognitive ability of a person due to their decreased speed and reactivity. CBD actively protects these myelin coatings and ensures that the brain does not age as rapidly and that it does not receive the same damage from diseases like those listed above.

While it may not be a cure-all, and there are things that CBD cannot do for the body, the lack of major side effects, the potential ability for CBD to replace other supplements, and the reported health benefits (as proven in studies) point towards CBD as a viable option for all those looking either to address specific issues, or just give their body an extra boost. As always, consult your doctor before replacing any medications or supplements with CBD products; however, know that it is a possible alternative that should be seriously considered.

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Give Hemp Products For Christmas!

December 17th, 2018 by Cara Oorbeck

Hemp-Based Clothing and Durable Goods by

Op-Ed Blogger Quinton Charles

As the United States House and Senate have just passed the previously discussed 2018 Farm Bill, domestic hemp producers are now cleared to produce hemp and hemp products on an industrial scale. At least they will be as soon as the President has signed off on it.  Hemp will become more widespread, and derived products should see an overall decrease in price on the market. Hemp and cotton create a combination that decreases sweat retained in the fabric and, consequently, results in an article of clothing that can be worn more often and does not require the near-constant cleaning that cotton fabrics do.Trucker Hat

So why is this important? Some of these hemp-based products poised to become both widespread and inexpensive are hemp-based clothing and similar durable goods. While the clothing that is made of hemp fibers can be almost any form of clothing currently produced using cotton, the other durable goods made of such fibers would include paper, rope, and non-wearable textiles (blankets, etc.). Each one of these products has a slightly different cost-benefit relationship, and I’ll elaborate on each independently.Christmas Sales

First, the most common, well-known, and most likely to be purchased by consumers (like you and me) is clothing made of hemp fibers. While not conspicuously differing from cotton-based clothing in appearance, hemp-based clothing has several distinguishing features that appeal to the users of other clothing types. The hemp-based cloth has no attachment to any other uses for hemp, and can easily move production to a different state  It also is environmentally friendly, with a negligible footprint. This “green” status is the result of hemp not requiring any pesticides or large amounts of water to grow, unlike cotton. In fact, hemp requires 50% less water than cotton. A consumer can feel at ease knowing that their purchase of a hemp-based shirt or pair of socks is decreasing the stress placed on the environment and that they are supporting companies whose operations are not severely detrimental to the Earth’s health.

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It isn’t just environmental impacts that purchasing hemp clothing has, however. There are some other features of hemp clothing that make it quite appealing. First, it breathes. Hemp fibers are porous and resistant to mold.   Hemp fibers are also very strong, which means that holes will be less likely to appear in the fabric over time, and the item will be able to be worn longer. This durability goes hand-in-hand with the fact that the hemp’s texture becomes softer after each wearing, increasing the overall comfort of the item while retaining its robustness. One of the only downsides to hemp is that it can be a bit more prone to wrinkling than cotton clothing. However, certain styles of hemp clothing and manufacture have been able to decrease the tendency for hemp clothing to wrinkle, effectively eliminating this shortcoming.

As of yet, a large amount of hemp-based clothing and other durable goods have yet to be mass produced by American firms. This is partially due to demand, but also can be attributed to the economic conditions that existed prior to the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill. Even now, internationally produced hemp and hemp fibers were some of the most inexpensive available. It will eventually balance out with domestic producers able to source their hemp from American growers, leading to a decrease in the cost of hemp as compared with cotton

One place where hemp will gain traction is in recycled paper. The cost of directly replacing wood with hemp in the production of new paper is still too high to merit a change over to hemp, but the fibers have been found to be more cost effective to use in reinforcing and strengthening recycled paper, which is becoming a larger source of total paper produced. As regulations require more and more paper to be recycled, hemp is going to play an increasingly important role in recycled paper production.Colorado hemp honey ginger soothe

So while hemp paper may not be as exciting or widespread yet, textiles like blankets and clothing are becoming common and are seen as a viable alternative to cotton products due to their low environmental impact, superior durability, and their ability to become more comfortable the longer they are used. Hemp clothing will, no doubt, become a major use of hemp in the near future.

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CBD Market Is Rapidly Changing After Midterms

December 13th, 2018 by Cara Oorbeck

CBD Market

By Quinton Charles Op Ed Blogger

Election is changing the market on hemp

Recent law has changed in several states regarding the legality of cannabis. This all came on the heels of the recent election that also saw several legalizing states flip house, senate, and gubernatorial seats from Republican to Democrat.

On the ballot in Missouri and Utah, medical cannabis programs were approved (enabling people with medical conditions to have access to cannabis products containing, and not containing, THC), and, in Michigan, voters outright legalized cannabis (including variations containing THC). While the legalization of marijuana and THC containing strains of cannabis in no way affects the legality of CBD-based products, it does alter the market in one important way: an increase of the supply of cannabis on the market.  What also is stipulated in the legislation passed is that cannabis, of all varieties, can be legally cultivated in those states. This is closely tied to the US 2018 Farm Bill, which, if passed, will legalize the cultivation of cannabis on industrial levels.   Fingers crossed this is happening as your reading! This means more jobs, in fact it is one of the fastest growing industries for job openings. It will also impact availability and cost as some of these states get up and running.

Checking out the changes in different places

So let us look at different states, and what transpired in this most recent election. In Missouri, a state that, up until recently, had some of the harshest punitive laws regarding the possession and/or growing of cannabis in the country, legalized medical marijuana use and cannabis cultivation by individuals. This not only legalizes the conditional use of cannabis containing THC, but it also enables the growing of hemp for CBD purposes, as well as enables individuals to cultivate their own hemp for home use with exemption from punishment. The good news fr those of you living in states that still have not passed new laws is that it is likely that this development will lead to other, nearby states adopting similar laws once the negative perception of cannabis legalization abates.

In addition to Missouri, Utah, another state known for conservative laws regarding THC and CBD, voted to legalize cannabis along similar lines as those of the aforementioned state. This legalization would have similar effects as those that I mentioned regarding legalization in the state of Missouri. Individuals will be permitted to grow their own cannabis/hemp for home use, and both THC and CBD based products would be available to people with a qualifying medical condition.

Finally, Michigan fully legalized the use, distribution, and cultivation of cannabis statewide. In addition to having similar effects as other states with less inclusive legalization (legalization of home growing, increased supply, etc.), the legalization, the result of a popularly-voted proposal (that still would require the confirmation of the legislature, hints at something else that I have not touched upon: popular demand for cannabis and/or hemp products. While marijuana (containing THC) and CBD-based products differ, they are often carried in dispensaries side-by-side and sold by businesses that specialize in cannabis-derived products. It is likely that, due to a support of legal marijuana in the state of Michigan, CBD goods will experience an uptick in sales and interest as people are no longer driven away by the erroneous assumption that CBD-based products are illegal.

There is another bill up for consideration in Texas, SB 90. This bill would enact similar standards and requirements for cannabis use and cultivation as those in Utah or Missouri. Currently, this seems likely to pass, and the city of Austin already is saturated in dispensaries and CBD selling establishments.

Finally

It needs to be noted that, while the legal status of marijuana and cannabis changed in these three states (and is proposed to change in a fourth), the legal status of CBD under federal law, has never been under any threat within the last decade. The laws that changed in states regarded cannabis with high THC levels not Hemp based products with .3% or less of THC; so, while the legalization affects the supply of cannabis plants within states, and perhaps increases the demand for similar, salutary products derived from hemp or cannabis, it does not affect the legal status of CBD itself. CBD will still be available to sell and ship throughout the  US when it is from a hemp plant and that level of THC is .3% or less.


Whole Plant Research

November 15th, 2018 by Cara Oorbeck

Whole Plant Research

By Cara Oorbeck Green Wellness Life Operations Guru

Advances In Scientific Research

Western science has made so many advances in medicine since the nineteenth century through its methods of scientific research. By carefully isolating and excluding variables that might impact the result, science has been able to find the very chemical compound that has an effect at a particular amount, in a particular group of people. However, some researchers are beginning to see a limitation in the current methods. This is in part due to limitations in knowing how complex systems behave. For whole hemp cannabidiol (CBD) research and other new phytotherapeutics research, this is called therapeutic synergy.Whole Plant Image Read the rest of this entry »


Farm Bill & November Voting 2018…Part 2

November 1st, 2018 by Cara Oorbeck

2018 Farm Bill

Co-authored By: Op-ed Blogger, Quinton Charles & Green Wellness Life Operations Guru, Cara Oorbeck

A Lot Happening With Hemp

In 2018, 38 plus states considered legislation relating to hemp including current law clarification, removing current legislative obstacles and establishing new programs and research.  The hemp industry is moving in many directions and has the potential for new and innovative products in a variety of areas which include paper, fabric, health and beauty products, animal feed, food, insulation and so much more. The 2018 Farm Bill and its possible legislative effects, should it be voted into law is an enormous step forwards in federal Hemp policy, and has already cleared the Senate’s agricultural committee.  However unresolved issues in the proposed Bill prevented an agreement before the Bills deadline on September 30th (food stamps, crop insurance, and some cotton provisions) and most experts agree that the Bill’s future depends on who keeps or gains control of the House of Representatives after November 6, 2018.

Some Of The Key Players

Read the rest of this entry »


Farm Bill 2018 and its Effects on the Hemp Industry

October 25th, 2018 by Brandy Palmer

farm bill hemp 2018

By Quinton Charles Op-Ed Blogger

Changes in Farm Bill

Until 2014 (and its farm bill of the same year,) hemp was illegal to cultivate. What the farm bill of 2014 changed was that it allowed either small-scale cultivation by farmers or experimental cultivation by research laboratories (and, often, a combination of the two), and left up to the discretion of the states the extent to which they wanted to permit hemp cultivation. Unfortunately, the 2014 Farm Bill was unable to completely legalize industrial-scale growing, and farms were limited in size, thus forcing vendors of hemp-derived products (like CBD) to import hemp, increasing their prices and access to goods. That all may change now.

Not just CBD users will benefit

If the 2018 Farm Bill is signed into law (and it is currently on the way to being so), the industrial production of hemp by domestic producers in the United States would be legal, and the price of most CBD oil products would likely decrease (as well as access to CBD products being expanded). In addition to allowing hemp to be grown by domestic producers, it would also remove several barriers to their acquisition of banking and crop insurance http://(https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/s2667)

Those who will NOT benefit

Read the rest of this entry »


CBD Oil Products In Legal Grey Area Under Ohio Law

October 19th, 2018 by Brandy Palmer

Legal Grey Area Under Ohio Law

CBD Oil Products in Legal Grey Area Under Ohio Law

In the state of Ohio, as opposed to elsewhere in the Midwest, cannabidiol (CBD) is classified as Medical Marijuana; most CBD products on the market are derived from Hemp Cannabis Sativa Specified as “all parts of a plant of the genus cannabis, whether growing or not; the seeds of a plant of that type; the resin extracted from a part of a plant of that type… the resin extracted from the mature stalks, fiber, oil or cake, or the sterilized seed of the plant that is incapable of germination,” (Ohio Revised Code Title (37) XXXVII 3719.01 (O)), the definition of “Marihuana” within the state of Ohio includes CBD sourced from Cannabis Indica, which is sourced from the resin of the plant.

Why does this matter?

You are probably wondering “why do I need to care how Ohio classifies CBD?” Fair question.  If you ever use CBD oil, then this information is incredibly important, and I’ll get to why. The most recent house bill in Ohio regarding Hemp and Marijuana, House Bill 523 (passed in 2016), prohibits any non-licensed dispensaries from selling what is designated “Medical Marijuana.” As CBD lacks any intoxicating qualities, it does not have the same effects as Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is associated with the type of “high” that people receive from cannabis products that contain THC. “Medical Marijuana” as defined by the state of Ohio is “marijuana that is cultivated, processed, dispensed, tested, possessed, or used for a medical purpose.” (Sub H.B. No. 523, sec. 3796.01 (A) As I had already discussed before, the state of Ohio includes CBD derived from Cannabis Indica in its definition of “Marihuana,” and because of this, its definition of “Medical Marijuana” also includes CBD derived from Cannabis Indica, but not Hemp Cannabis Sativa.

Purchasing CBD in Ohio

So what does this all mean for the status of CBD in the state of Ohio? It means that, unless licensed by the Ohio Department of Commerce and the State Board of Pharmacy (Ibid., sec. 3796.02),no dispensary can sell or offer CBD products derived from a specific type of Cannabis. But what if you have one of the pre-approved medical conditions (epilepsy, alzheimer’s, etc.) Sub H.B. No. 523, sec. 519.21 (D.6.a-v) that entitles you to receive a medical card in the state of Ohio that allows for the purchase of Medical Marijuana? Then you are fully able to purchase CBD for use, no problems. But unfortunately, there are some snags in the system, and there currently are none of the 56 promised dispensaries in operation run by the state of Ohio. However, this does not mean that there is no way to get CBD in the state of Ohio. Some business owners, like Kevin Kidd, continue to operate their stores and sell CBD products, despite a lack of licensure. Kidd has argued that, since CBD oil he uses is hemp-derived, and not marijuana-derived, he can continue to sell CBD oil products. As of yet, he has not been required to shut down or to stop selling CBD products.

For now, the sale and use of CBD in the state of Ohio will remain in an awkward, legal grey area, invariably hurting those who either rely on CBD for its medicinal qualities, or for those who rely on the sale of CBD to keep their stores open. If the people of Ohio are lucky, the state’s Pharmacy board will start issuing licenses to businesses soon; however, until that time, CBD will have to be purchased at the older establishments that sold, and continue to sell, hemp-based products.

CBD and Midwest States

For the people of other Midwestern states, such as Michigan, Wisconsin, and Indiana, hemp and hemp-derived products continue to be fully legal under both State and Federal law. Their purchase is permitted, as is their use and sale. So, despite Ohio’s setbacks, the Midwest is on track to be a region that aligns with Federal law, where citizens can enjoy the benefits of hemp-based CBD products.  At Green Wellness Life, we operate under that federal law and will continue to service our customers throughout the Midwest, including the great state of Ohio (even though there are Buckeyes there.)

By Quinton Charles Op-Ed Blogger