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Minor Cannabinoids

August 25th, 2022 by Brandy Palmer

Minor Cannabinoids

Minor Cannabinoids: What They Are and What to Know

Minor Cannabinoids

Cannabinoid wheel

When you think about hemp and marijuana plants, usually two compounds come to mind – THC and CBD. While those two major cannabinoids are the most well-known, they are far from the only compounds that are found in both hemp and marijuana. Would you like to learn more about what else is in these plants? Let’s jump in.

What Are Minor Cannabinoids?

Minor cannabinoids get their name not from their possible value to your health, but from the quantity in each plant.  They’re less abundant than THC and CBD but potentially even more important. At present, there are more than 120 compounds found in hemp and marijuana plants.  While the medicinal use of cannabis can be traced back thousands of years, this is still a new science and we are learning more about both the major and minor cannabinoids and their possibilities every day.

While this is far from a complete list, here are some cannabinoids that are considered minor that you may want to learn more about.

CBN

CBN, or cannabinol, is formed in a cannabis plant when THC is exposed to heat and light (oxidation.) This can occur naturally over time or can be sped up in a lab environment.  While CBN was initially THC, it’s important to note that CBN is not intoxicating – you won’t get high from it.

CBN has been shown to have sedative properties. Many products that are intended to assist with sleep will contain both CBN and CBD.  Studies show that CBN may also assist with pain relief when married to CBD.  You can find CBN, and many other minor cannabinoids, in all the same product forms as CBD – from oils to gummies and capsules.

CBG

CBG, or cannabigerol, is considered the “mother of all cannabinoids” because it serves as the precursor for all the other compounds. It is derived from young hemp or marijuana plants. As the plant grows, CBGA and CBG convert to other cannabinoids.  Just as CBD imitates endocannabinoids that occur naturally in our bodies, CBG will also bind and work to neutralize cells, bringing us to a level playing field.

CBG is non-intoxicating. It can make people feel energized and focused, rather than relaxed. This makes CBG popular among people searching for a cannabinoid to boost productivity.

CBDA MoleculeCBDA Molecule

CBDA

CBDA is probably our favorite minor cannabinoid here at Green Wellness Life.  CBDA is an acidic precursor to CBD. It is the compound in the plant that eventually becomes CBD with heat and time.  In our experience, CBDA is the most effective compound for dealing with persistent discomfort.  Non-human studies are backing this up, finding that greater benefit is found with much lower servings of CBDA than CBD.

Raw and heated cannabinoids interact with different receptors and enzymes in the body.  Raw options like CBDA may be less active in the brain, which means they are hyperactive in the body and gut.  That may be why people often report better or more sustained inflammation relief.

CBC

CBC , or cannabichromene, also stems from CBGA. It was discovered in the 1960s and is the third most prominent cannabinoid found in cannabis, after CBD and THC.  While we know that it works in conjunction with THC and CBD to keep our system neutral, we don’t know much more than that.  Research suggests that it is a potent anti-inflammatory and could be more beneficial than CBD in mood enhancement. CBC is non-intoxicating and one of many potentially beneficial minor cannabinoids.

THC-O

Many of us have never heard of THC-O.  That may be because it does not naturally occur in the plant in the ground. THC-O is the shortened name for THC-O-Acetate, also called ATHC. It can only be produced in a laboratory environment. Lab tests show that THC-O can be 300 percent stronger than regular THC.

THC-O is intoxicating. As such, it can only legally be purchased from a licensed dispensary, even in states where recreational marijuana is legal.  Use caution when purchasing this or any synthetic cannabinoid – it’s more likely a temporary trend than a natural compound with consistent benefits like CBD.

THC-V

THC-V, or tetrahydrocannabivarin, is a naturally occurring minor cannabinoid. It’s most commonly found in African Sativa marijuana. The jury is still out as to how intoxicating THC-V can be.  The buzz associated with THC-V, from the small amount of research available, appears to be clear-headed and stimulating, lasting about half as long as THC intoxication.  Some research shows that it is useful as an appetite suppressant and THC-V products are certainly gaining popularity in that area with fans calling it “skinny pot.”

Delta 8 THC

Delta-8 THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is an additional psychoactive cannabinoid. The natural amount of delta-8 THC that occurs in cannabis is very low. As such, additional chemicals are often used to convert other cannabinoids, like CBD, into delta-8.  Initially, it was sold over the counter as a legal marijuana alternative that provides less euphoria than THC but still provides relaxation along with potentially lessened negative side effects.

States have quickly caught on to the intoxicating nature of delta-8.  At the time of this article, 20 states have classified delta-8 as illegal or have restrictions on how it can be sold. As with THC-O, we would recommend using caution and only purchasing from a reputable source, as delta-8 may be synthetically made.

How Do Minor Cannabinoids Work?

Minor cannabinoids interact with our endocannabinoid system (ECS) just as CBD and THC do.  They bind to receptors that have a range of effects on everything from our brains to our gut and everything in between.  The ECS exists and is active in your body even if you don’t use cannabis.  It works using compounds you create to promote homeostasis (balance) throughout your entire life.  When you take in major or minor cannabinoids, they bind to that system and get to work keeping you neutral.

The Entourage Effect

If you’ve heard the phrase ” the whole is more than the sum of its parts” then you already understand the entourage effect.  Put simply, many people find that cannabis plants work better when taken as a whole, made up of those 120+ compounds than broken apart into individual cannabinoids. That doesn’t mean that there is no value if you isolate and use CBD or CBN or even THC alone, but it does mean you may see a greater impact keeping them together.

Final Thoughts

There is still so much to learn about all of the minor cannabinoids working together in cannabis.  If you’re just getting started with cannabinoids. our CBD 101 is an excellent resource.  If you’d like to learn more, but have specific questions or prefer to chat with a human, we can do that, too. Reach out to us toll-free at 888-772-7875 or email us at support@greenwellnesslife.com. We look forward to chatting with you!


CBD 101 A Beginner’s Guide To CBD

March 12th, 2022 by Lashonda Broom

 

CBD 101 BlogCo-authors  Lashonda Broom & Cara Oorbeck(GWL Staff )

 Lashonda Broom, RN & HHP                       Cara Oorbeck, GWL Staff
Cannabis Nurse Medical Reviewer,

Cannabinoids, or compounds found in hemp and marijuana plants, are definitely a popular topic these days.  So what’s all the fuss about? What are these compounds and how do they work? How do I take them and how much do I take? And most importantly, what will it help me with? 

Whew, that’s a lot of questions. Let’s start with our bodies and the system that these compounds interact with. It is often assumed that the benefits derived from CBD and other cannabinoids are a result of introducing some substance not already found in the body to your system. This couldn’t be farther from the truth. Let’s talk it through. 

What is CBD?

Before diving into how cannabinoids interact with the body, it’s first important to have an understanding of what CBD is. CBD is a natural essential oil that is rich in nutrients and one of over 100 different cannabinoids found in cannabis plants. Scientists are still researching cannabinoids and there may be more we haven’t yet identified. 

CBD can be found in all of the different types of cannabis plants, but it is more prominent in hemp plants where it makes up about 40% of the cannabinoids extracted from the plant. CBD is not psychoactive like THC, so it will not produce any kind of high. 

What is the ECS…Endocannabinoid System?

The Endocannabinoid System or “ECS,” is a system that provides the body with many similar cannabinoids to those of hemp oil. Cannabinoids are complex chemical compounds that act on receptors in cells. The hemp plant produces over 100 different cannabinoids (or phytocannabinoids); the human body (as well as other mammals) also naturally produces cannabinoids (or endocannabinoids). This means that your body already uses cannabinoids for many of its functions, such as regulating mood, appetite, pain-sensation, and memory. These cannabinoids promote homeostasis (balance) at every level of biological life. 

What do Cannabinoids do?

The function of cannabinoids in your body (regardless of whether they are naturally produced by your body or from a plant) is to act as receptors for cells. What these receptors do is act as conduits for messages from the brain to the cells. They are the “bridge” that enables your body to operate as it should. Because of this, they are essential for a healthy body, which includes memory, appetite, and mood.

While your body uses the endocannabinoids produced internally, it also reacts to phytocannabinoids from sources like cannabis and hemp. This is where CBD and other plant-based cannabinoid oils come in.

Endocannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2

The ECS is composed of two primary endocannabinoid receptors: CB1 (found predominantly in the brain, nervous system, and outlying organs and tissues) and CB2 (found predominantly in white blood cells, tonsils and spleen). Although CBD has low affinity for either of these receptors, it does interact with other nominal receptors with remarkable effects. For example, CBD activates the receptor GPR55, which has been shown to assist in treating pain and inflammation. CBD has also been shown as a partial agonist (which is a term referring to something that attaches to a cell receptor and causes an action to occur in that cell) to the 5-HT1A receptor, which may lead to cannabidiol’s anti-depressant, anti-anxiety, and neuro-protective effects.

Why take daily CBD?

Because the ECS is involved in the body’s communication with its cells and their functions (including repairs), cannabinoids are crucial for the body’s constant repair of cells and their functions – maintaining that balance. When more cannabinoids are introduced to this delicate system, they can stimulate the cells into functioning as the brain directs them to, and can facilitate healing where the body’s own ECS has failed. In this, it is clear that when the ECS is failing to do its job, phytocannabinoids from CBD oils can “pick up the slack” and act as receptors for cells that were malfunctioning due to a lack of endocannabinoids. This makes CBD crucial for maintaining (or, in many cases, restoring) a healthy balance of receptors in the body.

Isolate, Full Spectrum or Raw?

Finding the right CBD for your needs and body can be confusing. We answer customer questions all day long and we have found that there is no one size fits all. Each individual is different. One criteria that is important for everyone is quality. It’s important to make sure that you’re taking a product free of harmful contaminants. Additionally, you want to make sure that what you think is actually in that bottle is really there. You can only do that through a lab test.  Your takeaway for CBD 101 is to make sure that you’re taking a lab tested product. If you want to learn more about that, take a look at our article on unraveling lab reports.

Next up, let’s take a look at the different forms of CBD: What is the difference between them? Who would use which version, and why?

Is CBD all that I want from the plant?

First of all, it’s important to understand that cannabidiol (CBD) is only one of the major compounds that are present in the cannabis plant – both hemp and marijuana. It happens to be one of the most studied compounds by scientists because of its powerful potential and the fact that it occurs in greater quantities in the plant than some of the other more than 80+ compounds. As evidence of its interest to scientists and researchers, CBD has been used in multiple pharmaceutical solutions. One of the most recent to be approved by the FDA is Epidiolex, a CBD-based drug used to treat childhood epilepsy.

Full Spectrum CBD Oil: A Rainbow of Compounds

Despite its fame, CBD is not the only major compound found in cannabis sativa. There are a range of other compounds that make up the plant. When we are talking about all of those compounds together, we use the term “full spectrum.” This is just another way to say “whole plant”. A full spectrum CBD oil means that manufacturers use the whole plant and all the cannabinoids that are naturally occurring as active ingredients in your product. 

Full-spectrum is unique in that it can introduce the user to the possible positive effects of the other components of cannabis working together, often referred to as the “entourage effect”. Though there are many different cannabinoids in the plant, here are a few of the better-known ones included in full spectrum products.

  • THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) – Full-spectrum CBD from the hemp plant does include trace amounts of THC, which is well-known as the psychoactive element of cannabis – or the part that makes you high. That THC level can’t be more a .3% concentration when coming from a hemp plant, so it has no psychoactive effect. There is technology that is isolating the THC out of some full spectrum products making it what is now being referred to as a “broad spectrum.” This means that it started as a full spectrum (whole plant) product, but the THC was isolated and removed. These products will usually specify 0 THC.
  •  CBN (Cannabinol) – This component of cannabis does not occur in as great a quantity, so we don’t know quite enough about it yet. What science is finding is exciting, though. Some early studies are showing that there may be real benefits for people struggling with sleep issues.
  • CBG (Cannabigerol) – Interestingly, CBG has been shown to stimulate growth of new brain cells and bone growth. These unusual properties make it a fascinating compound for researchers to study.
  • THCV (Tetrahydrocannabivarin) – THCV has a similar molecular structure to THC and is also psychoactive. Research is finding that it’s very similar to CBD as well, in working to balance and neutralize cells.

All of these compounds, and many more, interact in a full-spectrum product. Who would this form of CBD work for? A full-spectrum CBD oil would work great for someone who wants to work with all the elements of the cannabis plant for a holistic approach. It would be very useful for those who are interested in other compounds, like CBG and THCV, and their effects. We have often seen excellent results for people living with inflammatory pain. 

It’s important to keep in mind that unless clearly stated to be a 0% THC product, full spectrum products will likely contain a trace amount of THC. That legal limit, if coming from hemp, is 0.3%.  While it’s not likely that quantity would cause you to fail a THC drug test, it is possible. 

CBD Isolate

In a product made with a CBD Isolate, only one cannabis compound is present – CBD. It’s been individually extracted from the plant without any of the other cannabinoids, terpenes, or plant matter. Some might say that the isolate is missing some of the other compounds that make full-spectrum oil special. While this is true to an extent, there are plenty of reasons why someone might want just the CBD oil.

For one, maybe they’re only interested in specific CBD oil impact. If a customer has discovered that CBD works best alone to treat their particular disorder or ease their symptoms, then they would definitely want to stick with what works. Other people might feel uncomfortable with even trace amounts of THC. In this case, an isolate CBD is a perfect solution. 

Others may actually be allergic or have had bad reactions to other cannabinoids or plant matter. In this case, a CBD isolate would be the best choice.  Additionally, we have seen excellent results with isolate CBD for people looking for help with mood stabilization.  The other cannabinoids and plant matter aren’t usually as necessary to see a benefit there. 

Raw CBDA-CBD

Cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) is a chemical compound found in the resin glands (trichomes) of raw cannabis plants.” In this case, raw means unheated and uncured. Many of the conditions that respond with CBD also respond well to CBDA. There is a growing body of information that is talking about the benefits of raw or CBDA having a greater effect on people living with chronic pain. There is also a patent pending by GW Pharmaceuticals using CBDA in conjunction with CBD for anxiety and psychotic disorders.

Product Options

Now that you understand the way that the ECS works and the different processing types of products that come from cannabis plants, let’s talk about products. In short, CBD and it’s fellow compounds can come in pretty much any package type that you’re interested in – from chocolate to bath bombs to hemp flower. 

Pricing will vary but will be based on total milligrams of active ingredients per container.  When you see a 300mg lotion, that means that there are 300mg of cannabinoids in that whole bottle – not in each amount that you put on your skin.  You’ll see the same thing on a tincture, bottle of gummies, etc.  Those package sizes can vary as well.  Some are much more concentrated than others, so you may have the same amount of cannabinoids (your active ingredient) and a similar price point in a tiny 10ml bottle and a large 2oz bottle.  When you’re product shopping, you will want to look at that total strength per package as well as how much you’re going to take every day. 

We break it down into three main product categories – let’s talk them through: 

1) Topicals

These cover anything that you’re applying to your skin.  

  • Benefits in 15-30 minutes.  
  • The downside is that it won’t last as long – usually 4-6 hours.  
  • Topicals are a great fit when you’re dealing with a skin issue or are looking for inflammation relief at that site.  
  • Topicals won’t generally get into your bloodstream (with the exception of some CBD patch molecules that are small enough to do so).  
  • Intended to provide relief to the muscle, joint, and skin tissue.  
  • You can definitely use a topical along with a booster and a daily supplement. 
  • Use them where it hurts – when it hurts. Consistency isn’t key here.  

2) Boosters

Boosters avoid the digestive system to get to work quickly. 

  • Benefits in 15-30 minutes.
  • Like a topical, they get to work and then dissipate within 4-6 hours.  
  • Absorbed through your cheek or taken in through your lungs.  
  • The intent is to provide a bit of extra CBD on a day when you need it.
  • Use them as needed – consistency isn’t critical.  
  • As they are quick to leave your system, we wouldn’t recommend a booster as your only source of CBD and other cannabinoids. 

3) Daily Supplements

If you’re only going to take one type of cannabinoid, we would ask that you make it a daily supplement.  You’ll ingest these – and they come in all kinds of forms: 

Raw Oil

This is the plant extract in its most natural form – it’s likely been filtered 1 or more times and will taste grassy and earthy. Your serving size will be measured in paste quantity. We use the term “grains of rice.” Raw Oils will always be Full Spectrum. 

  • Pros: No additives, Flexible Serving Size
  • Cons: Difficult to Measure/Take, Earthy Flavor

Tincture

This is a liquid that you place under your tongue. It starts with the raw oil, but has a carrier oil and possibly flavoring added to it. Serving size will be measured in drops or dropperfulls. Tinctures can be Full Spectrum, Broad Spectrum or Isolated CBD. 

  • Pros: Flexible Serving Size, Added Flavoring, Quick Sublingual Absorption 
  • Cons: Can be Difficult to keep Serving Size Consistent

Capsules/Softgels

Capsules and Softgels are encapsulated tincture.  Serving size will be measured in capsules. 

  • Pros: Consistent Serving Size
  • Cons: Lack of Flexibility in Serving Size

Edibles (Gummies, Candies or Chocolate)

These options take a raw oil or an isolated CBD powder and add it into a gummy, candy or chocolate recipe. Raw Oils taste earthy, so full spectrum edibles are harder to come by than more filtered options. Serving size would be measured per piece. 

  • Pros: Easy to take
  • Cons: Lack of Flexibility in Serving Size, Priciest Option

How Much Do I Take?

Our goal is always to see the best possible results with a minimal amount of stuff in your system.  We talk in terms of serving size rather than “dose” because CBD is considered a food supplement – not a drug. In our experience, most people see benefit between 15-50mg daily.  We do have customers that do well with 5mg daily, and others who need 100mg, but 15-50mg taken consistently is the standard. 

We know that when you’re hurting, it’s always tempting to take a high serving to feel better.  We encourage you to step away from that and start small.  Some people do very well with a small amount of CBD to get their body back into neutral. We all want to be that person! Start there and work up if you need to. CBD supplements are intended to work over time – not instantly.  Don’t jump your serving up on a bad day – that’s what boosters are for.  If you’re not consistent in your serving size, you may not see the benefits that you are hoping for.

Getting Started

If you’re new to CBD, here’s how we recommend getting started: 

  • Day 1-5: Start with 10-15mg daily
    • Be consistent with the time of day that you take it. Raw CBD can be energizing, so we recommend morning. 
    • Any supplements that are sleep aids should be taken 30-60 minutes before bed. 
    • We always encourage you to take CBD on a full stomach.
  • Day 6-10: If you aren’t seeing the benefits you’re looking for, double your daily serving to 20-30 mg. 
    • Stay consistent
  • Day 11+: As long as you are seeing some benefit, stay the course. 
    • You can continue to increase your serving as needed, giving your body a couple days to adjust
    • You’ve got cannabinoids in your system, so your adjustment time will be quicker
    • If you’re not sure if you are seeing benefits, stop taking it for 3-5 days. That’s enough time for you to see if there was a difference for your system. 

We love starting with a tincture (liquid) because that serving size is so flexible, but if you’re more comfortable with a gummy or a softgel, go with that! The best CBD for you is the one that you will take every day. I’ll say it again: The best CBD for you is the one that you will take every day

No One Size Fits All

Whatever your choice when it comes to CBD, it’s important to make sure you’re aware of your options, in both product type and serving size. What your body needs may change. Every system is unique. We know it’s hard to hear, but there truly is no one size fits all. At the end of the day, the best CBD for you is the one that you are most comfortable with and see the greatest benefit from. 

Sources 

 


What Are CBGA, and CBDA?

January 12th, 2022 by Cara Oorbeck

There is a study that was released recently by Oregon State University that discusses promising findings about the potential effects of CBDA & CBGA in blocking the cellular entry of sars-CoV-2 and other emerging variants.  According to the university, “Van Breemen and collaborators, including scientists at Oregon Health & Science University, found that a pair of cannabinoid acids bind to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, blocking a critical step in the process the virus uses to infect people.

The compounds are cannabigerolic acid, or CBGA, and cannabidiolic acid, CBDA, and the spike protein is the same drug target used in COVID-19 vaccines and antibody therapy. A drug target is any molecule critical to the process a disease follows, meaning its disruption can thwart infection or disease progression.

We at Green Wellness, want to make sure you know that these are currently just studies and much more research needs to take place before this can be said conclusively!  However we thought you may want to know a bit more about some of the minor raw cannabinoids and what products you can find these compounds in.  Not all CBD products have CBDA and CBGA in them.  Keep reading to learn more!

New acronyms?

While we typically associate cannabis with two cannabinoids (THC and CBD), there are dozens upon dozens of other, rarer, cannabinoids contained within each plant. So why don’t we hear more about these other chemical compounds? Their rarity. Most cannabis plants will contain only around 1% in mass of all the minor cannabinoids. In fact, this is why you don’t see isolates sold of CBN, CBDA, and CBG; they are too costly to isolate and sell at profit. 

But, despite their low concentrations in cannabis, they do have potential benefits to bodily wellness and their positive effects can be understood with a little reading and curiosity. Shall we delve deeper into three of the more common of these rare cannabinoids?

CBN: THC Transformed

Our first cannabinoid is CBN, which is a compound that arises when THC is subjected to high heat or light for long periods of time. This transformation is why cannabis with high levels of CBN has usually undergone oxidation or aging. It goes from being THC-9 (C21H30O2) to CBN (C21H26O2) by losing four Hydrogen molecules. 

But that sounds like a lot of confusing chemistry. What are the benefits of CBN and why should you care to know more about it? Before we continue to discuss the potential benefits and uses of CBN (in and out of the body), it needs to be understood that there is limited research on this compound. Only a handful of studies demonstrating CBN use in the human body have been published, and most current research focuses on its effects in mice (which, to these studies’ defense have remarkably similar nervous systems to humans. Who knew?)

The first use I want to focus on is the use of CBN as an antibacterial compound. In lab settings, CBN was tested on strains of MRSA bacteria that are resistant to traditional antibiotics. Researchers found it to be a potent antibacterial agent against these resistant strains. Perhaps in the future, we will see CBN used as a replacement for some antibiotic pairings. 

It may also have uses as a neuroprotectant. In one rodent study, researchers used CBN as a treatment for ALS and found that it was able to delay the onset of the condition. While further studies need to be conducted to determine if this effect is also seen in humans, these findings suggest that CBN may provide a powerful tool in the fight against ALS and other neurodegenerative conditions.

In other rodent studies, CBN increased the amount of food that rat subjects ate, suggesting that it could be an effective appetite stimulant. Since some avoid THC (another well-known appetite stimulant) due to its intoxicating effects, CBN could potentially offer an alternative for those seeking benefit without the high—but more research is needed.

Likely the most common recent application of this specific compound, however, has been to address those sleepless nights that I’m sure we are all too familiar with. CBN has long been associated with drowsiness. In the world of hemp and cannabis, there is a quote from Steep Hill, a cannabis laboratory, that is frequently used when describing CBN’s sedative effects. They claimed that the consumption of 2.5mgs to 5mgs pf CBN had the same level of sedation as a mild sedative, with a relaxed body sensation. More research is needed and Green Wellness does not diagnose, prescribe, or treat, but the potential sleep benefits are simply too good to ignore. With CBN sleep gummies, tinctures, and even capsules with higher levels of CBN, if interested there are lots of mechanisms to potentially benefit from the compound.

CBG: Decarboxylated CBGA

The CBG cannabinoid originally stems from CBGA. After undergoing an oxidation process, it becomes CBG, a compound that can directly interact with the endocannabinoid system of the body. 

One of the challenges of using CBG comes from the prohibitive cost of sourcing it. As a cannabis plant ages, more and more of the initial cannabinoids oxidize and turn into the common cannabinoids of CBD and THC. CBG, on the other hand, never comprises a significant proportion of the cannabinoids within a harvest of cannabis. 

This being said, despite the cost, difficulties of sourcing, and insufficient human research, CBG has been found to interact with the body’s CB1 and CB2 receptors, having a strong affinity for the CB2 receptor. These receptors regulate physiological processes such as mood, pain response, and appetite. More research is needed, however, as CBG appears to interact with the body’s endocannabinoid receptors differently than either THC or CBD, producing unique physiological effects.

While there’s an abundance of awareness around the major cannabinoids THC and CBD, less is known about CBG.  CBG shares some similarities with CBD: it seems to be anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial. However, CBG also boasts its own unique set of properties, offering potential therapeutic benefits such as treatment for inflammatory bowel disease and glaucoma in animal tests. I know I’m a broken record here, but, more research is needed (especially in humans). 

CBDA: CBD’s Precursor 

I think it is fair to say that, if you are a regular customer of ours, you know quite a good deal about CBD. Even if you don’t take it regularly, it seems that CBD has entered into the public consciousness these days (with many misunderstandings abounding). But where does CBD come from? The easy answer is the cannabis plant, which is mainly true. But were you aware that there is a chemical precursor to CBD? That precursor is CBDA. 

So how does CBDA become CBD? With heat and time. Think of CBDA as the “raw” form of CBD. In fact, a lot of people will take CBDA in capsules, tinctures, and topicals to get that raw form into their daily diet. We’ve definitely got more options for CBDA than CBG or CBN. Green Wellness carries many CBDA products with brands like Endoca, Plus CBD, Entourage CBD, and Hemplucid. But what are the benefits of this?

Your CB1 and CB2 receptors are the primary nodes in your body for actively making use of CBD, both that which you take as a supplement and that which is naturally produced within your body. CBDA doesn’t work in this way. Instead, CBDA interacts with the endocannabinoid system by inhibiting the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. COX-2 enzymes are associated with inflammation after an injury or infection. By blocking COX-2 enzymes, CBDA can relieve inflammation and associated pain.

In one rodent study, scientists found CBDA affected levels of serotonin, a chemical produced by nerve cells to aid in signaling between cells. Serotonin is vital to core human functions like motor skills, sleeping, eating, digestion, and emotions. However, excess serotonin, which often is associated with stressors like chemotherapy, can cause nausea and vomiting. Vomiting can be controlled with medications, but nausea is harder to treat. But do not despair yet if you are a chemo patient! Scientists have demonstrated that CBDA can affect the body’s 5-HT serotonin-producing receptors, hinting at a potential use for CBDA as a medication for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and other conditions that induce these symptoms. However, more research is needed.

We will keep you updated!

One recurrent theme throughout this blog was that more research was needed. While THC and CBD are gaining popularity, and the institutional barriers to research using these compounds are removed, it is important to keep in mind that there is a lot that is either not understood or is poorly understood about cannabis in relation to the human body. We will try to keep you up to date on relevant and recent research so that you can make informed decisions and purchases, and we always invite you to get in touch with us with any questions that you may have. 

As always, we hope that this was informative, and would love to hear from you on our social media accounts, our email, or on our phone lines. If you are ready to explore the world of CBD, give us a call at 888-772-7875, fill out an online contact form, or press the live chat button to speak with one of our experts.


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